Missing Bees — How You Can Help

About a decade ago, bee biologists began to observe that several wild bumble bee species were declining dramatically. Three of them were important crop pollinators: the western bumble bee, once one of the three most common bumble bees in the western U.S. and Canada, the rusty patched bumble bee, which was widespread in 26 eastern and midwestern U.S. states and two Canadian provinces, and the yellowbanded bumble bee, which was frequently found throughout the east and upper Midwest of the U.S. as well as most of southern Canada. A fourth, Franklin’s bumble bee, historically had a small range in southern Oregon and northern California and may now be extinct.

What caused the decline? Commercial rearing of bumble bees for crop pollination may be the culprit. Bumble bee expert Robbin Thorp believes that members of these closely related species probably caught a disease from a European bee in the same rearing facility. The North American bumble bees would have had no resistance to the pathogen, which then spread to wild populations.

The Xerces Society is asking citizen monitors as well as scientists to be on the lookout for these species and report back with any findings. You can find photos, identification tips, information on the life history and habits of the bees, and contact information in the Bumble Bees in Decline section of their website. 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.